Posted by: sel3 | May 21, 2007

Smoking

One of the things I don’t miss about Jordan is how much people are free to smoke anywhere! They just like to ignore rules which ban smoking. The sign “No Smoking” is not considered compulsory or is not taken seriously, it is a joke or an extra piece of decoration, and I think it means you are not allowed to smoke within 20 cm2 around the sign, or maybe you are not allowed to puff the smoke on the sign itself! We see people smoking every where, starting from our homes to taxis and buses, hospitals and even classrooms! Yes, some teachers do smoke inside of the classes.

I remember the toilets in the school during the breaks were like a big ashtray with thick-like-fog smoke all over the place! Boys were smoking “Viceroy” and buying it for (5ams groosh 6afye o b sete eza mwal3a” five piastres or 6 if it was lit! And when one teacher is out of cigarettes (6afran 3a a5er eshahar) he raids on the toilets (kabse) and takes cigarettes from the boys, but no serious measures are taken to make the boys stop smoking in school. Boys start smoking so early I remember seeing 5 years old boys smoking dry sticks of “mlo5eye” I wonder where would this end?

Our hospitals are not in a better shape, maybe except for new or private ones, and even there you still see people smoking in waiting halls or in cafeterias. I remember last Jan. when I was in Jordan I visited my friend who is a nurse in a public hospital, he was on duty in the ICU and I had to go to the ICU room to see him, we sat there chatting then after five minutes he wanted to smoke a cigarette but he can’t leave the patients unattended, so he stands next to the door, start a cigarette, hold it outside of the room, gets his head out of the room takes a puff or two in the corridor then gets his head back inside! It is extremely not correct his behavior, but sadly this is what happened.

Smoking is very widespread in Jordan; we have the highest percentage of smokers among students in the world. And despite that we are a country with one of the highest rates of cancer disease; still we are not doing any thing serious to stop it. Most of the world countries are putting laws to prevent smoking in public places, even in streets in some other countries, while in Jordan we are smoking in schools, hospitals, buses, even in the airport, last time I arrived at the airport in Amman the smoking area was like 4×4 meters room, and when I left, one week later, it was shrunk into 1×2 meters because no one is using it, people are smoking every where, even under the no smoking signs!

 

And to congratulate myself on my first post here is a cigar for me!


Responses

  1. Yes, I used to go to ittihad schools in tabarbour next to the “7araj”, we used to go there buy “magali” sandwiches, with a cup of “ghazalen” tea and two “viceroy” cigs!! The nice thing about me that I can stop smoking at anytime and come back at anyother time, I used to smoke two packs a day but now I almost smoke 6 cigs a week mainly on mondays and tuesdays(Don’t ask me why)!

  2. That’s true sel3, but honestly that’s one thing I love about Amman, you can smoke the minute you walk out of the airplane! and I never smoked mlookhiyeh before!😦 … I should really try those one day.

    Listen, here’s a true incident that happened to me … after just one week of quitting smoking, my friends got me a box of cigarettes to celebrate!!

    mabrook the first post🙂

  3. I am so against all types of smoking, from Cigarrettes, to argeeleh’s. People in Jordan are immature when it comes to smoking and abuse it big times. Not only that, they abuse us non-somkers by forcing us to smell their filth (sorry smokers, but yes, this is for any inconsiderate smoker out there)..
    The best thing about living in the US (my personal experience) is that i even forget the smell of cigarrttes because I never am forced to smell it, but my nightmare starts when I visit my family in Jordan… If i ride a public bus or sarvees, or even taxi, I have to always ask the driver or one of the passengers to put out their cegarrettes.. And then I get that evil eye.. “what? min wain enti ya bint?”…imagine? that happened with me many times, and I just got sick of them! I open the window wide open, untill they get irritated, and put it off!

  4. Talking about signs, my dad has this big clear sign in the guest room that reads, “Thank you for not smoking” in both, English and Arabic, yet when my uncle visits he ignores the Arabic version, and says: “ana ma bafham engleeezi” (means: i don’t understand English).. lol

  5. Have you seen the movie “Thank you for smoking”? … It’s brilliant!

  6. nope, haven’t seen it.. but seems interesting😉

  7. OMG, when I visited Jordan when my daughter was only 4 months old I had to lie and tell them she is allergic to smoke so people won’t smoke around her.

    who-sane: Loved the movie, it phenomenal! How the gun , smoking and alcohol advocates sit and talk about it!

  8. Mohanned, mazboot kona nshalef fel elforsa la nafs elsabab.

    Who-sane, ma beday eyaha el mlo5eye, o forsa abatel do5an balki tele3li karoz ebalash!

    Secratea, I think even somkers themselves hate second hand smoking, that’s why whenever someone next to them lights a cigarette the start one too😉 and regarding signs I remembered another funny thing when Jordan forced tobacco co. to put a photo of a lung with cancer on the pack, people said it is a commercial; collect 10 packs and you get a free mo3lag!

    7aki, people just don’t believe that anyone, even infants, are irritated by smoke itself w/o having an allergy or a flue or something like that.

  9. hubby is just like who-sane..he loves amman and syria because he can smoke anywhere..he even complains how horrible canada is because smoking is not allowed at all at timhortons anymore..walak complain about something that makes sense…my home is mostly like Amman now…i have a no smoking signs all over..i even added a picture of the kids saying thing of us…bas yeh..i love our chinese neighbour who goes outside to smoke along with his 70yo mother even when it is -40degrees cel.


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